Home About us Contact us RTI Act Advertisements

 

More of KVK, Hailakandi

District Profile

Facilities

Gallery

Staff Position

Web Links

 

 

 

* District Profile, Hailakandi

Hailakandi district in the southmost part of Assam. It is located between longitude 92025' to 92.460 East and latitude 2408' to 24.530 North. it has an average elavation of 21 meters(68 feet). The total Geographical arear aof the district is 1327 sq.km of which rural area is 13167.47 sq km and Urban area 10.53 sq.km. the district is situated in the middle of Barak Valley and bounded by Cachar district in the north and east, Mizoram state in the south and Karimaganj district in the west. The district consits of both plain and hilly areas. It was a civil subdivision on 1st June 1869. Subsequently, it was upgraded to district in 1989. Hailakandi comprises of three notified towns viz. Hailakandi(district headquaters), Lala and Algapur and one industrial township viz. Panchgram. A Manucipal Board governs Hailakandi town & a town Committee governs Lala. It has five development blocks viz. Algapur, Hailakandi, Lala, Katlicherra & South Hailakandi block. The district is having 62 Gaon Panchyats, 331 revenue villages, one municipality board and two town committees. There is also a small township at ‘Hindustan Paper Mill’ area at Panchgram in ‘Algapur block’ area. The connectivity of the district is comprised of road NH-53 and NH-154 and railway (Meter Gauge). Only 22 % of the PWD roads are surfaced, having 78% of un-surfaced roads in the district which indicate that access and availability of good road connectivity in the district is very low. Nearest airport is Kumbhigram airport which is located 83 Km from the district headquarter. The total population of the district is 542872 (2001 census) out of which 44085 is urban population and the rest 498787 is rural population with population density of 409 persons per sq. km. Hailakandi has an average literacy rate of 59.64%:. The district is mainly inhabited by Bengali, Manipuri (Bishnupuriya and Meitei) and Rajbongshi community. The main language of the district is Sylheti, Bishnupuriya Manipuri and Manipuri Meitei.

Demographic Profile, 2001 Census


Population

452872

Rural Population

498787

Urban Population

44085

Sex ratio (female per 1000 males)

935

Percentage of literacy

59.64

Density (per sq. km.)

409

Distribution of Main Workers, Marginal Workers and Non Workers, 2001 Census

 

Population

Male

Female

Total Workers

179881

136510

43371

Main Workers

138216

116620

21596

Marginal Workers

41665

19890

21775

Non Workers

362991

144003

218988

Cultivators

62747

52114

10633

Agricultural Labours

25690

18961

2729

Household Industries Workers

5728

1938

3790

Other Workers

85716

63497

22219

Climate

The climate of the district is characterized by hot and humid. The summer starts from March and continue till October. Winter generally starts at the end of November and continues up to February.

Rainfall

The average annual rainfall of the district is 2441.94 mm with 123 average rainy days on the basis of last ten years record (1999-2008). High rainfall generally concentrates during the month of May to September though floods were also experienced during March to April due to the occurance of heavy rainfall in Mizoram draining in Dhaleshwari river which flows through the middle of the district resulting floods in the Hailakandi district. Winter months December to January remains generally dry without or with scanty rainfall.

Temperature

The annual mean maximum temperature ranges between 32.8° - 34.4° Celsius and mean annual minimum temperature ranges between 10.0° - 12.2° Celsius. Average Maximum temperature recorded at 33.9°c and minimum at 11.5°c from the last 10 years of temperature records (1999 – 2008).

Mean yearly rainfall (mm) and temp °C data from 1999-2008

Year

Rainfall (mm)

Temperature °C

Maximum

Minimum

1999

2148.90

34.4

10.5

2000

2681.3

32.8

11.4

2001

2543.2

33.9

11.1

2002

1903.4

33.9

11.1

2003

1683.33

33.9

11.1

2004

2759.30

33.9

11.6

2005

2907.92

33.8

12.2

2006

2242.62

33.9

11.8

2007

2978.7

34.2

11.7

2008

2284.10

34.1

12.1

Soil Characteristics

The soils of Barak Valley Zone owe their origin to Shillong Plateau and other surrounding hills to a large extend and main river of the valley has minor contribution to it. The soils are formed from the sedimentary rocks like sand stone, shale and sandy shale depending upon situations and the soil varies from sandy to clay with pH ranging from 4.5 to 5.9. The texture of the soil varies from sandy to silky loam.

Agro-climatic zone:

Assam is delineated into six agro-climatic zones on the basis of physiography, climate, soils, cropping pattern, etc. Hailakandi along with other southern district of the state viz. Cachar and Karimganj district lies in the Barak Valley Zone It occupies 19.26% area of the Zone bounded by Cachar district in the north and east, Mizoram state in the south and Karimganj district in the west.

Agro-ecological situation:

Based on physiography, climate, soils, cropping pattern, etc. the district is divided into following five agro-ecological situations:-

  • A.E.S. I (Beel and Hoar) covers Algapur, Hailakandi and Lala block. Here water logged situation persists perennially, water level recedes during winter. Soils are peat & organic soils. Cropping system is mono-cropping of low lying rice and natural fishery.
  • A.E.S. II (Alluvial flood prone situation) covers Algapur, Hailakandi and Lala Block. Soil is riverine alluvium and old mountain alluvium, sandy, clay loam soil type. Medium to low land inundated during monsoon. In this agro-ecological situation summer rice is main crop followed by late sali/vegetables
  • A.E.S. III (Alluvial flood free situation) covers Hailakandi, Lala, Katlicherra and South Hailakandi block. Physiography of this AES is broad plains with gentle slope. Soil is old mountain alluvium, sandy/fine loamy type. Rice is mainly grown as mono-crop or double crop or rice in sequence with vegetables.
  • A.E.S. IV (Plantation crop growing situation) covers Hailakandi, Lala, Katlicherra and South Hailakandi block. Physiography is dissected foot hills, low hills, undulating topography with tillahs and narrow valleys, gentle to moderate slope. Soil is mostly non laterized red soils, old mountain alluvium, fine silty. Main crops are tea, pineapple, fruit trees and vegetable.
  • A.E.S. V (Hill and forest situation) covers Algapur, Lala, Katlicherra and South Hailakandi block. Physiography is high hills and dissected foot hills, undulating lower hills and hillocks with steep slopes. Soil is mostly non laterized red soil, laterized red soils, sandy/loamy/coarse loamy, fine silty and fine loamy. In forest villages mixed cropping with trees and bamboo are found as natural vegetations.

Name of Agro-Climatic Zone

Area of the Zone Covered by the district (%)

 

 

AES

Cultivable area of the AES

Block wise spread of area in ha & % under different AES

 

Ha

 

%

Algapur

Hailakandi

Lala

Katlichera

South Hailakandi

 

Ha

 

%

 

Ha

 

%

 

Ha

 

%

 

Ha

 

%

 

Ha

 

%

 

Barak Valley Zone

 

19.26

I

1648

3

1920

12

286

2

108

1

-

-

-

-

II

8405

15

3920

36

2310

19

1807

10

240

4

128

2

III

9525

17

960

9

1425

11

4256

23

780

12

2104

27

IV

25214

45

2850

26

8584

68

7125

38

3565

58

3090

39

V

11205

20

1752

17

-

-

5273

28

1610

26

2570

32

 

 

Total

56033

100

10772

 

12605

 

18569

 

6195

 

7892

 

Existing major farming systems:

Agriculture – Animal husbandry – Fishery.
Agriculture – Horticulture - Animal Husbandry - Fishery,
Fishery – Agriculture
Agriculture – Animal husbandry/Poultry
Agriculture/Horticulture – Animal husbandry/Poultry

Major enterprises: 

Agriculture – Paddy (Autumn, Winter and Summer rice), Rajmash, Pea, Rape seed and Mustard.
Horticulture -  Arecanut,  Coconut, Pineapple, Citrus, Colocasia, Kharif and Rabi vegetables, Turmeric, Ginger and other fruit trees like Jack Fruit, Mango, Papaya, etc.
Animal Husbandry - Cattle, Buffaloes, Goat, Sheep, Poultry, Duck and Pig.
Fishery – Beel and Haors, Rivers, Canals, Ponds and Tanks.

Land use pattern of the district

Geographical area of the district is 132700 hectares of which 42.22% is cultivable area, 42.29% is cultivable area, 4.29% is cultivable waste, 3.09% is current fallow, 48% is forest area, 0.70% is pasture, 6.47% is land in non agricultural use, 1.42% is under miscellaneous plantation and 1020% is barren and waste land. Due to inadequate availability of irrigation facilities 82.49% of the cultivable land is cultivated.

Block wise land utilization pattern in ha

Operational land holdings

The total operational land holdings in the district are 78056 nos. out of which 28.78% are landless farmers, 39.53% are marginal farmers, 26.62% are small farmers, 3.26% are medium farmers, 1.39% is large farmers and 0.42 % is very large farmer. In the district the low cost technology has better adoption probability in comparison to high cost technology. The farmers needed financial assistance from the financial institutions constantly to raise their income through the production of their farming systems.

Agriculture, plantation and Horticulture crops

The agriculture in the district is merely at the mercy of rainfall as only 2.59% cultivated area is irrigated. Rice is the principal food crop in the district and approximately 95% of the farmers are either marginal or small are doing the “Subsistence farming” Rice occupies 82% of the gross cropped area. The main source of irrigation in the district is low lift pumps, which are installed by the farmers themselves. Other important crops are kharif and rabi vegetables, colocasia, potato, rajmash, sweet potato, pea, rapeseed and mustard etc. The coverage of above crops fluctuates little due to poor resource, irrigation facilities, onset of monsoon etc.The available irrigation facility is mainly confined to summer paddy and rabi vegetables crops in selected pockets. Under the existing situation, there is a very limited scope for multiple/intensive cultivation of field crops hence; livestock and poultry have the better scope of expansion in comparison to other commodities. Out of the total geographical area of the district 33.2% is under cultivation of which paddy is the main crop covering an area of 36500 ha.
The agro climatic condition makes it ideally suited for Plantation and Horticultural crops. Development of Horticulture not only helps in creating additional job opportunities for unemployed youth but also useful from the point of value addition to the food and food processing units. Horticultural crops are grown in unscientific methods particularly in homestead locations/plantations which deprive the farmers in obtaining higher production. Horticultural fruit crops like banana, pineapple, Assam lemon, etc are grown in about 3260 hac, vegetables, medicinal and aromatic plant is cultivated in an area of 5069 hac. Plantation crops like areca nut, coconut and cashew nut is cultivated in 3415 ha. With the introduction, adoption of high yielding varieties of rice and use of urea accelerates the production and productivity of both autumn and winter paddy during last five tears.

Area coverage of major agricultural and horticultural crops in 2008-2009 with average production and productivity

Agri. And Horti crops

Area in ha.

Production in thousand ton

Productivity kg./ha.

Autumn rice

5806

1466

2526

Winter rice

40450

9101

2250

Summer rice

3900

916

2949

Rajmah

330

19

590

Pea

250

15

585

Rape and mustard

750

33

442

Arecanut

2995

2701

902 (Dry nut)

Coconut

440

1056

2405

Banana

1547

19200

12520

Pineapple

1020

12954

12700

Citrus

382

1202

3147

Colocasia

300

39

13100

Kharif vegetable

2155

2724

12640

Rabi vegetable

4500

7888

17530

Turmeric

235

13

545

Ginger

130

12

920

Other fruits Viz. Jack fruit, Mango, Papaya etc.

780

247

3170

Livestock and Poultry

The economic of the district is highly dependent on Agriculture and allied activities. Livestock comes next to agriculture. Cattle, Buffalo, Poultry, Duckery, Goatery tec. are the main constituents. Traditionally livestock and poultry is a subsidiary occupation of the farmers of the district. Cattle are mainly indigenous non descriptive low yielding comprising 89.35% of total cattle population of the district which are mainly reared for draught purpose and milk for domestic consumption. Other than cattle buffaloes, goat, sheep and pig are also reared in the district. Poultry comprises of chicken, ducks etc. which are mainly indigenous type reared in backyard for egg and meat purpose. Majority of the poultry farmers belong to small and marginal/landless farmers which is mostly confined to backyard rearing. Goatery is more popular than sheep rearing. Goat and pigs are mostly reared in rural areas in traditional way for meat purpose.

Livestock Status of the district (2008-09) (Unit in numbers)

Livestock

Crossbreed / Improved

Indigenous

Total

production in lac/nos/Mt

Cattle

16742 (CB)

140601

157343

60.5 lac lit.

Buffalo

166 (Imp)

33481

33647

5.42 lac lit.

Goats

-

69670

69670

21 MT. meat

Sheep

-

13506

13506

5.0 MT. meat

Poultry bird

4298 (Broiler)

399392 (Layer)

403690

6.0 MT. meat
2.50 Lac egg

Ducks

-

173200

173200

100 lac egg

Others

-

23527

23527

 

Total

21206

853377

874583

 

Fishery

Fishery is an important enterprise in the district as most of the people are non vegetarian and fish is treated as an essential supplement to their staple food. Production of fish generally takes place in natural water bodies like beels, hoars, rivers, canals etc. as well as artificial water bodies like ponds, tanks etc. There is total number of 7761 ha of water area. The available sources are ponds and tanks with 3195 ha (41.67%), beel areas with 922 ha (11.88%), natural river area 1589 ha (20.48%) and other sources constitutes 2055 ha (26.48%) of the total water area of the district. Of the total fish production ponds and tanks produces approx 4410 MT, beel produces 1224 MT, rivers 545 MT and other sources 101 MT. Due to reduction of beel and other water areas by rapid urbanization and water pollution the production of fish is reducing drastically.

 

Source wise area under fishery in the district in 2008-09

Source

Area in ha

Production in MT

Productivity MT/ha

Ponds and tanks

3195

4410

1.42

Beels

922

1224

1.38

Rivers

1589

545

0.34

Other sources

2055

101

1.10

Total

7761

6279

1.06


* Information as obtained from District Agriculture Officer, Halakandi.

 

 

 
 

Website Developed by: Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Hailakandi

ICAR (RC) for NEH Region Mizoram Centre, Lashkmisahar-788152, Hailakandi, Assam

Disclaimer